613-390-0723

Book Your Appointment

Facebook

Google Plus

Twitter

Category Archives: Uncategorized

Online Booking Now Open!

Cynthia DeRoche is now accepting bookings online. When you book, please make sure to read your emails carefully as there are some requirements for pre-screening. Bronwen Gemmill is not accepting online booking at this time.

When are we going to start scheduling treatments again?

We were excited to hear the news Wednesday that the Ontario government has given the go-ahead to health care providers to begin providing non-essential services immediately. This would include massage therapy services.
We thank you for your patience over the last two months. We have missed you and look forward to seeing you soon. However, we must take careful and measured steps. There are still several obstacles to be overcome:
1. The go-ahead provided today was generic to all health care providers. We did not receive advance notice so we are waiting for a full response from our regulatory college (CMTO) on how to proceed.
2. As you will have undoubtedly heard, the demand is overwhelming for PPE such as, masks, face shields and sanitizers. These items are in short supply worldwide. The safety of our patients and our massage therapists is paramount and we must have these necessary safety precautions and measures in place before we can reopen.
3. We have been advised by the CMTO to update our guidelines on Infection Prevention and Control. The required readings are hundreds of pages and these updates require many changes in our clinic, which will take some time.
4. The directive from the Ministry of Health calls for a gradual reopening with a limit in the number of visits for the safety of our clients and RMTs.
As we work towards reopening, rest assured, once the necessary safety protocols are in place we will be contacting you to start scheduling appointments.

Gift Certificates

We regret that we are not able to sell gift certificates at this time. Because the clinic is temporarily closed, it seems prudent to wait until we are able to treat again before accepting payments. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

A Note on COVID-19

Sadly, because of COVID-19, Massage Remedy is closed until further notice. Online booking will not be available until we are given a directive by the province and our governing college that it is safe to resume practice. We look forward to providing massage therapy for you in the future.

Direct Billing Available!

Do you hate paperwork? Are your massage receipts collecting in your wallet, or getting lost? No problem, I will submit your receipts for you and bill your insurance provider directly. The approval from your provider is instant and fool proof. All you have to do is remember to bring your insurance card. Just another way I’m trying to provide you with great customer service and personalized care.

New Scheduling System, JaneApp

Most of you have probably received an email by now inviting you to register for the new online booking system. JaneApp is user friendly and you should find it just as easy as the previous system. I encourage you to register by clicking the link in your welcome email so that there is a seamless transition as your profiles are merged from the old system to the new.
I’m always trying to offer the best service to my clients, and JaneApp allows me to do just that. Electronic charting saves mountains of paper and makes record collection easier if you ever need me to provide copies of your chart to a third party, like your insurance company. Thanks for your continued patronage!

New Payment Option!

By popular demand, debit payments will now be accepted for your massage therapy session. Using your debit card is a great way to support small business owners who often have to pay high fees for credit card transactions.

How Often Should I Get a Massage?

body-massage-1428380-1599x2397

After a great treatment, the obvious next question is, “When should I come back?” The answer depends on many factors, such as your budget, your available time, and most importantly, what your treatment goals are. While there are no simple answers to this question, here are some guidelines that may help you to decide on a treatment schedule that is best suited for you.

It’s important to remember that the effects of massage are cumulative. Each massage builds on the one before it. If you wait too long between treatments, your tension may have come back and then we’re back to where we started. On the other hand, if you are diligent about following the home care advice you’re given, you’ll find that you can stretch the benefits of the massage and decrease the treatment frequency.

Consider how long you have had your pain. If you’re experiencing a chronic, long-standing condition, several treatments close together might be more effective. This tension has built up over weeks, months, or years, and it will take more than one or two treatments to get back on track. Coming more frequently will give the best opportunity to override habitual muscle patterns and get to the root of your problem. For instance, if you’ve been suffering from headaches for a few years, weekly treatments for 3-4 weeks should start to have an impact. Once you’re seeing the results you want, it’s time reduce the frequency to every 2 weeks. Don’t reduce the frequency until you are getting consistent results. Follow up with monthly maintenance so the headaches don’t come back. Chronic conditions are often related to your most frequent activities, such as sitting at a desk or participating in your favourite sport. If you can avoid the trigger, maintenance may not be neccessary, but if you still have to sit at that desk every day, maintenance is recommended.

If you’ve come for massage therapy for a recent trauma, such as a sprained ankle which is more acute, time is of the essence! Get a treatment as soon as you can. It can reduce the pain, speed up your healing time and promote better healing with fewer adhesions and more mobile scar tissue which can have a long-term impact on the success of your recovery. You don’t have to wait until the pain is gone. Your massage therapist is able to use many techniques within your pain tolerance that will still be effective even if very gentle massage is all you can tolerate. Get a few short treatments, perhaps twice a week during the acute phase, reducing the frequency as your body heals itself.

For athletes who are in regular training, weekly massage can support your training and help you to avoid injuries. It’s a great way to keep your muscles healthy, and to improve your body awareness. You’ll find that your regular massages will inform you of asymmetry in how you’re strengthening your body, postural imbalances, weak areas, and trigger points which may negatively affect your training, all of which may leave you vulnerable to injuries.

If you’re choosing massage therapy as a way to help you relax, destress, or to pamper yourself, then treatment frequency is entirely up to you. You know best how much stress you have and when you’re in need. So if you have a very stressful job, you might come often, maybe every week. If you only get stressed at certain seasons (tax time, year end, holidays), maybe you’ll only book at those times of the year. I encourage you to plan ahead for those difficult¬† times you see on the horizon so you get a time that is convenient for you.

Every situation is unique and needs are always changing, so talk to your massage therapist about your goals. Of course, you are always welcome to come as often as you’d like!

Plantar Fasciitis Slowing You Down?

foot-2-1455183-639x852

Plantar Fasciitis is characterized by pain at sole of the foot, typically the bottom of the heel. The first few steps you take in the morning or after periods of rest are usually painful, and there will be tenderness if you press into your heel. Many people live with this condition far longer than neccessary! If your doctor has diagnosed plantar fasciitis, and ruled out other possible causes of your foot pain, consider the following tips to help get you back on track.

1. Massage Therapy on the calves and feet can reduce pain and trigger points and reduce the stress on the heel and plantar fascia.

2. Massage your own feet first thing in the morning or after prolonged rest to warm up the tissue, make it more pliable, and to avoid repeated tearing and inflammation of the plantar fascia. You can use your hands, or try rolling your foot on a tennis ball.

3. Good footwear is extremely important. High heels, or shoes without proper support can put extra strain on the bottom of the foot. Get some good quality, supportive shoes and wear them as much as you can, even in your home.  A certified Pedorthist may also recommend orthotics or other foot aids.

4. Stretch your calfs. To stretch the right calf, stand a little less than an arm’s length away from a wall. lean with your arms for balance and extend your right leg behind you, keeping the knee straight, and press your heel into the ground. Hold for 30 seconds, then repeat the same stretch, but with your knee bent this time. Repeat on the left.

5. Ice your foot to reduce pain and inflammation. Use a frozen gel pack or roll your foot on a frozen water bottle.

6. Rest! If you know which activity is causing the problem, take a break from it for a while. Plantar fasciitis is caused by excessive pressure on the arch of the foot, so avoid running, standing for long periods of time, expecially on hard floors, stairs or hills, etc.